Hunting

3 Tips for Rabbit Hunting With Beagles

portrait of a Beagle dog on the background of thick fog during a walk in the autumn Park

While hunting rabbits without dogs is possible, it’s always a lot easier to have a good beagle or a few beagles with you to do most of the work. However, just having some dogs isn’t enough. You need to also learn how to make the most of having those dogs at your disposal. Here are some tips to help.

Give Your Beagles Time to Go to Work

Happy beagles having a fun on a autumn backgraund
Image from Getty

Too many rabbit hunters rush. Even if it doesn’t seem like you are rushing, make a point of slowing down. Your dog or dogs are usually going to work at a pace that’s more or less set by you. If you’re moving fast, they will too. This means you can go right past a rabbit without kicking it up or spotting it.

By slowing down and letting your dogs take their time, they’ll be able to flush the rabbits properly and avoid overlooking anything. This means you can stand back and look for the fruits of their labor.

Learn Your Dog’s Characteristics

Every dog is different. I don’t have any dogs myself, but I’ve hunted with several other hunters who have them, and one thing I’ve noticed is that there’s no two beagles alike. Some dogs are good jump dogs, some are better chase dogs. Take some time to learn what the dogs you’re hunting with are good at.

If you know their strengths, you can keep that in mind as you encounter new terrain. This will also help you adjust your pace as needed. Some dogs work best when they’re moving a little faster. This still doesn’t mean you should rush, but it means you can pick up your pace just a little bit.

Let the Rabbit Circle

Rabbit in Tall Grass - PC Sean McGee via Unsplash
Image by Sean McGee from Unsplash

As many of us know, when a rabbit runs it usually makes a big circle. This means it’ll come back to the area where it was originally flushed.

This means if a rabbit flushes and you can’t get a shot, sometimes you can just wait and let your beagles do the work of bringing the rabbit back around. Just wait a bit and keep your eyes peeled. More often than not, you dogs will bring the rabbit back around.


Do you have any additional tips or tricks you think should be added to this list? Leave a comment below!

3 Tips for rabbit hunting with beagles

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3 comments

  1. Avatar

    #1. Sometimes you will find a rabbit hiding in his bed and no one but you is aware of his presence. Resist the temptation to shoot. Rather coach the dogs to find the rabbit and let the chase develop before you take your shot. #2. Once the chase is over and you shot the rabbit, be sure to “thank” the dogs for a job well done. A treat is good but love and kisses work better. #3. Don’t mix and match you dogs. Gun dogs and field trial dogs are often totally different in hunting temperament. Not only will they not pack together it will just lead to total frustration. I have more tips but your will have to take me rabbit hunting

  2. Avatar

    How many beagle’s would you recommend for one person hunting rabbits?

    1. Wade Thiel

      One is probably enough to be honest. You could do two dogs, but I wouldn’t go more than that.

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